Monday, April 30, 2012

Ulmus Gavafolia

Yes, Doctor Greg has developed a new variety of Ulmus (Elm). After viewing a dead stump of Ulmus americana (Amercan Elm) for a little over a year I took the bull by the horns and have created the new variety of Elm.
Yes there it is, the research facility of Dr. Greg. See the compliant American Elm stump ready to sacrifice its dead cambium layer for research.
Kinda muscular for a Elm I must say.
Drum roll please.....
I give you Ulmus gavafolia (Galvanized Elm)
What can I say...pure genius. lol.

26 comments:

  1. I like trees that spontaneously create mulch for me. Very handy. Your garden looks great!! I bought my marguerites at High Country, too. :o)

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  2. Looks like it decided to Go Texan! Very nice, easy on the cleanup and handy too. Definitely genius.

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  3. I liked the dead stump but mulch works too! Glad you put it to good use.

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    1. Yes I liked the stump when it had bark and ivy, it looked kind of rustic. The tin is ornamental and will also act as a heat chamber to rot the wood.

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  4. Love it! Back breaking job. Your Blue and silver combinations are very pleasing. I remember the dutch elm disease and its affects on the mature trees.

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    1. Americans elms were over planted in the 50's and 60's. When you have a monoculture like that and have a major disease outbreak you lose a lot of trees. The same thing is happening with live oaks and ash. I see a lot more healthy American Elms than I used to and a lot of new Ulmus varieties.
      In Oklahoma, Ulmus parvifolia (lacebark elm, true chinese elm) has gained significance mainly by the support of Dr. Carl Whitcomb when he was at Oklahoma State University. I'm afraid some day these trees may have issues as they have been widely planted.

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  5. Ha! Great idea. We did something similar with the stump of our Cherry tree, which sadly bit the dust a few years back. Now it's the base of the bird feeder, and seems to be working quite well. I agree with Karin--the dead stump was fine, but now you can plant more plants!

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    1. Yes more plants. Problem is what plants? hmmm.

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  6. Greggo, what a fabulous idea! The whole little island looks wonderful.

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    1. Yes, I'm into heavy metal. Right next to the stump is "heavy metal' switch grass.

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  7. It almost appears that the Austinites all drove up in between storms, and surprised you with a perch to place some hardy z6b (z7a?) agaves!

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    1. yes, yes. zone 6 agaves, are there ones?

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  8. LOL...excellent! I like the look of the entire bed, and you have made it look even better.

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  9. Well Greggo, where there's a will.

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  10. Are you trying to say that you did not like that stump there Greg? LOL! Your bed looks wonderful with the grasses and blues going on.

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  11. Very nice new variety.
    Your garden looks terrific!

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    1. Yes, I plan on patenting the new variety. Thanks the garden is at a good place.

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  12. I love your blue flowers, and your garden looks beautiful.

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    1. Thanks, and your Baptisa's are outstanding.

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  13. magnificent garden photos..... Love the form and texture...

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  14. I have a couple of stumps of my own (Eucalyptus) that desperately need that treatment--what did you do, exactly? Your street side garden looks fantastic: lots of texture, movement, grace.

    An Agave you might try is A. parryi or A. parryi truncata. The most beautiful of the hardy Agaves, and not too big, not too aggressive, readily available.

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  15. Don't memorize it, I am sure the taxonomists are already thinking of renaming it.

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Thanks for leaving any comments, they are always welcomed. Sorry I had to add word verification as spam was becoming a huge problem. Greggo,