Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Wildflower Wednesday May 2012

 The third Wednesday of the month brings us the Wildflower Wednesday meme. Gail at Clay and Limestone shares this day on her blogsite. Go there and share you natives with others who strive to bring more natives into our gardens.
 Callirhoe alcaeoides - Pale Poppy Mallow. I scavenged these beauties above in  a vacant industrial lot next to my work, a former Kansas prairie. Initially they were just a small rosette such as the photo below.

 Rhus typhina 'Bailtiger'-Tiger Eyes Sumac. This variety was originally found as a mutation in a cultivated nursery from R. typhina ‘Laciniata’. Although not native to Kansas this variety grows under the same growing conditions as the native varieties seen throughout our native areas. This plant was added to my hell strip last fall.
 Rumex crispus  L-Curly Dock. Ok, most people would classify it as a weed. (especially one of my neighbors), its the tall plant in the back ground. I wrestling with this one because it really likes this fertile area and has reached 5'. My original reasoning was to use the maroon seed heads as winter interest against the tawny foliage of the tall switchgrass.One probably would have done the trick, but like a glutton I dug three. ha. Found in the same lot.

Future gladness. Present gladness. Delphinium carolinianum  Walt.  subsp. virescens  (Nutt. ) Brooks-Prairie Larkspur. I wrote a blog post about this one last spring. Recovery and Recovery II. And yes I will try to recover some seed. Can't wait for this one to flower. And last but not least....the Milkweed!
Ascelpias incarnta-Swamp Milkweed

13 comments:

  1. I like the pale poppy mallow. The photos are great. I "recovered" some prairie larkspur, myself, over the weekend. I hope they take hold. The last one I rescued lasted about three years but never reseeded.

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    1. Even though they do not bloom long, they are special. I recovered some seed from a variety in Wyoming .

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  2. Greggo, with your landscaping background, I'm sure you know that the Tiger Eye Sumac will try to spread for the horizon...but I thought everyone else should know. It's gorgeous, but I've supplied most of the EMG's here with starts (chuckles evilly).

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    1. I suppose you are right, I'm just in denial.

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  3. Beautiful photos, as always, Greggo! I've never seen a white Callirhoe before...I must find that one!

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    1. I think there is one called 'Calhoun'.

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  4. Oh goodie....so many wonderful wildflowers. Love the white Callirhoe, I have the lovely rose colored one. I sure wish I had the space and sun for that beautiful swamp milkweed! gail

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  5. I enjoyed seeing your wildflowers.
    Last week I went to a Native Plant Sale and boutht 3 Swamp Milkweeds for $5.00 each. I am eagerly awaiting blooms for the butterflies.
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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  6. I'm impressed with all your rescued wildflowers. Every "rescue" I've planted immediately died, so I've had to buy starts instead:) I'm curious about your milkweed--did you start it from seed? I got a free packet of seeds with an order I placed, but I was thinking it was too late to plant them now and thought I'd wait till fall. I hope that's a good idea--I'm looking forward to drawing more Monarchs to my garden. Happy WW!

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  7. Wow, that Pale Poppy Mallow is a nifty plant! And I can't wait to see how the Delphinium looks in full bloom! I'm happy that my Delphiniums survived the winter. One looks more vibrant than the other one. I planted Swamp Milkweed this year, too. I'm hoping it will take off when we get a little more warm weather. Great post!

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  8. The Callirhoe alcaeoides - Pale Poppy Mallow is my favorite on this post.
    Very nice plants. Yea milkweed. I see three coming up in my garden this spring.

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  9. I love the white mallow. I wonder if it is as invasive as the wine cup. If not I would welcome it in my garden.

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  10. The white mallow has a delicate beauty to it. Seems so lovely in the landscape.

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Thanks for leaving any comments, they are always welcomed. Sorry I had to add word verification as spam was becoming a huge problem. Greggo,