Sunday, July 8, 2012

Back at Last

Kind of. Upon returning a week ago Monday from our eleven day vacation to Colorado and Wyoming, our laptop computer decides to hibernate. No longer showing it's technological  and digital masterpieces of artistry or data. Arghh. Isn't technology great? Or I should say, ain't it frustrating when you rely on something non-human or human I suppose, that just doesn't work. Therefore I haven't recieved my blog posting fix for two weeks and many ideas and inspirations have dissipated into oblivion. Maybe never to see fruition again. Let's hope not. My son brought his work computer along this week for a visit, so I am posting now.What a treat! I had a general idea about my next blog post ten days ago. However after reading a few posts from my favorite bloggers, I had to respond to Professer Roush's recent post on our visit to his garden. You can enjoy his post here.

I wanted to do full blown posts on many of the Xeriscape/Botanical Gardens I had visited in Wyoming. The gardens were cardoned off in Colorado Springs during the Waldo Canyon wildfire so I couldn't visit those. One of the plants I found fascinating at the Cheyenne Wyoming botanical gardens was the plant pictured below:
Centaurea macrocepha
At the time I couldn't figure out what in the world this plant was with the unusual bloom or seedhead? I had no clue. I plucked a bloom and asked my mother when we reached Casper. She couldn't identify it either. So I kept the bloom along with gathered seeds of other praire plants along our trip. After leaving Casper and visiting Professor Roush's garden in Manhatten, Kansas, we were saying our goodbyes and I spied the plant. The same one. The plant I couldn't identify. Centauea macrocepha! The professor had written a post on this plant previously after a garden tour, view this post here. Needless to say I grabbed two spent seed heads ready for planting. Yes!
Photo from Cheyenne Botanical Garden first visit.
Photo a week later.
A day later at Professor Roush's I recieved dried seed heads ready for next year! These images do not do it justice.
 Destiny I suppose. he he. My visit was a blast, even though it was over a hundred degrees and humid. Photos and stories will follow in coming weeks as I recieve my computer back. When ever you have a chance, visit your fellow garden bloggers as friendships can become real.





17 comments:

  1. There's a botanical garden in Cheyenne? This is something I'd like to see.

    We lived there for a few years and gardening was difficult to say the least. It snowed on my birthday in July. The native plants are sparse and interesting.

    Hope you get back on line so we can see photos from your trip soon.

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    1. Yes, the garden is right next to the rodeo grounds.

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  2. I was out in Wyoming last month. I wish I had known about a garden there.
    Love the plant-and glad you got seeds. As for the computer problems-good luck. I hate technology. (except for garden blogs!)

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    1. Glad you're back among the technoligically-enhanced, Greggo. You sly devil, you didn't tell me when you spied the plant that you'd been searching for its name. The rose name I couldn't remember, to my everlasting chagrin, was Golden Princess.

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    2. I suspect it was hot and dry then also.

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  3. Nice to have you back! One of the greatest rewards of blogging is the relationships. We have a group of Austin bloggers that meet monthly in each others gardens. It's my favorite monthly activity!

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  4. Glad you're back. I think we all have a love/hate relationship with technology.

    That's a great plant. Almost like a yellow artichoke bloom.

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  5. I grow this, too. Folks ALWAYS comment on it!

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  6. I have always wanted to visit Wyoming. I'll be looking forward to reading your posts about it. Loved your story about the plant. And I love that you're getting to visit some garden bloggers in person!

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  7. Hi Greggo, the Centaurea macrocepha (giant knapweed) also grows in our cooler conditions, fabulous picture of it. Look forward to seeing more from your recent trip.

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  8. Hello Greggo,

    I have been growing Centaurea macrocephala (I hear they also call it the basket flower)in the UK for about eight years which I started from seed. One of my favourites in the garden at the moment.

    I have just discovered your fantastic blog. Which is just the type I love to read with your exceptional photos.

    I have become your newest follower to track your garden adventures.

    Paul

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  9. A friend of mine lives in Manitou Springs. She was pre-evacuated then allowed to go back home.

    I love how gardeners manage to incorporate their love of gardening on vacations. I hope the botanical garden was a blast.

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  10. Could be your computer thought you had run off with some smart phone or something. Just apologize and maybe it will work...

    That little flower is cute-- good job securing the seeds to grow!

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  11. Wyoming is ... interesting. Yellowstone is grandiose and dramatic, but it sounds like you visited the eastern part of the state, too? That part is like no other place I've seen--high plains--fascinating. Vibrant blooms on a unique plant. Glad you're home safe.

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  12. Many Centaurea, many of them beautiful. That last photo is a keeper!

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  13. I always enjoy that moment when I discover what plant it is. Sounds like you had a great trip!

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Thanks for leaving any comments, they are always welcomed.